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Books Read 2014

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Odin
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Books Read 2014

Post by Odin » Wed Jan 01, 2014 2:05 am

Last year's thread is here.

I'm currently working on:


Finished:
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (J.K. Rowling)
Does My Suicide Vest Make Me Look Fat? A Soldier's Year in Iraq (John Ready)
The Man with the Iron Heart (Harry Turtledove)
Gideon Smith and the Mechanical Girl (David Barnett)
Red Storm Rising (Tom Clancy)
Button, Button (Richard Matheson short stories)
Dragon somethingorother (moderately crummy short stories)
Alloy of Law (Brandon Sanderson)
Inferno (Dan Brown)
The Hunt for Red October (Tom Clancy)
Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, From A Game of Thrones to A Dance with Dragons (James Lowder, ed.)
Sisterhood of Dune (Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson)
Mentats of Dune (Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson)
All You Need is Kill (Hiroshi Sakurazaka)
Storm Front - The Dresden Files, Book 1 (Jim Butcher)
Fool Moon - The Dresden Files, Book 2 (Jim Butcher)
Grave Peril - The Dresden Files, Book 3 (Jim Butcher)
Summer Knight - The Dresden Files, Book 4 (Jim Butcher)
Death Masks - The Dresden Files, Book 5 (Jim Butcher)
Blood Rites - The Dresden Files, Book 6 (Jim Butcher)
Last edited by Odin on Sat Aug 30, 2014 3:11 pm, edited 11 times in total.

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Holman
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Holman » Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:05 am

Last edited by Holman on Sat Apr 05, 2014 11:44 am, edited 9 times in total.
Much prefer my Nazis Nuremberged.

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Brian
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Brian » Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:38 am

Currently Reading:

NOS4A2 - Joe Hill

Image

Completed Reading:

Every Day Is An Athiest Holiday - Penn Jillette
In the same vein as his previous work, God No: Signs You May Already Be An Athiest, this book is Penn going on about the business of being Penn. If you've read the previous book or listen to his podcast, you know what to expect. It doesn't break any new ground or reveal anything particularly profound but was simply a fun read about an interesting person. Five out of five Binkys. :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void - Mary Roach
Much like her previous works such as Stiff and Bonk, Mary Roach brings a sense of fun and humor while exploring and explaining fascinating subjects. This time around it's the history of manned space travel and how it is leading to the hoped for future missions to Mars and beyond. How does the body cope with being in space and what does it take to get it there? Take a fun and funny look for yourself.
Not quite as good as Stiff but better than Bonk in my estimation. Four and a half Binkys. :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: Image

The Secret History of Star Wars - Michael Kaminski
An epic tome (seriously, this thing weighs in at nearly 500 pages) detailing the history of the Star Wars franchise from George Lucas' film school days through the completion of the prequel trilogies and the decisions, conflicts, and missteps along the way. This book describes George's writing process (or lack of) and his need to keep control of the series while at the same time loathing the process of creating the stories and how he would progressively take more and more control over every aspect of writing, producing, and directing the movies. It confirms what many have always suspected (He never had an overarching story written to encompass all 9, or even 12 at one point, movies, he would write himself into corners that required wild character divergence from one movie to the next, etc) and how the story of Star Wars went from being The Adventures of Luke Skywalker to instead, the tragic story of the life, fall, redemption, and death of Darth Vader. Who, by the way, was originally written as a one dimensional and relatively minor character.
Recommended only for those interested in a behind the scenes look at script writing and the decisions that brought the Star Wars story from greatness to mediocrity to sullen acceptance. Also, this was written before the sale of the franchise to Disney so the idea of sequels ever getting made is deemed unlikely but we now know otherwise. For me I would rate it at four Binkys but for most readers I would only rate it at three and a half Binkys at best. :binky: :binky: :binky: Image

Self-Inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humiliation - Aisha Tyler
Actress and comedian Aisah Tyler reveals some of her most embarrassing, brought-it-on-herself moments from throughout her life proving that if you can't laugh at yourself, others will be there to do it for you. As somebody with his own share of self-inflicted wounds (Worst. Day. Ever.) I could definitely commiserate with her many times over. A fun, if not terribly deep read but sometimes that's just what you are looking for and this one fit the bill. Four Binkys. :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Last edited by Brian on Mon Mar 10, 2014 11:32 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Canuck
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Canuck » Wed Jan 01, 2014 10:06 am

I'm probably not going to post here again so I'll just pop in to say that last year I was finally able to beat my goal of 30 books in a year which I'm really pleased about. I think I'll go for 35 this year. I'm interested to know what people are reading as it gives me good ideas for good reads so I'll put my Goodreads url here and hope that if anyone else also uses Goodreads then you'll add me. Just let me know that it's coming from OO.
https://www.goodreads.com/CanuckGT" target="_blank

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Odin
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Odin » Wed Jan 01, 2014 11:08 am

Canuck wrote:I'm probably not going to post here again so I'll just pop in to say that last year I was finally able to beat my goal of 30 books in a year which I'm really pleased about. I think I'll go for 35 this year. I'm interested to know what people are reading as it gives me good ideas for good reads so I'll put my Goodreads url here and hope that if anyone else also uses Goodreads then you'll add me. Just let me know that it's coming from OO.
https://www.goodreads.com/CanuckGT" target="_blank
I've added you, though I'm pretty sporadic about using Goodreads. I was pretty good about updating my OO list in 2012 and about 2/3 of 2013, then I got out of the habit and it's not complete for the year, either. Last year I updated Goodreads in January with all of my 2012 stuff. I may do that this year as well, after I get my OO list sorted out (which really just involves going into my library with a piece of paper and a pen and looking at what's on the shelves and then typing it in).

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Bad Demographic
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Bad Demographic » Wed Jan 01, 2014 11:22 am

Currently reading:

The Big Short by Michael Lewis
(I plan to finish these two this year!)

Read (or gave up!):
The Invisible Code by Christopher Fowler
The Line by J.D. Horn
The Android's Dream by John Scalzi (reread)
Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed
Deep Down by Lee Child
Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones
Archer's Goon by Diana Wynne Jones (reread)
Long Knives by Charles Rosenberg
Aunt Mariah by Diana Wynne Jones
The Discworld Graphic Novels - The Colour of Magick & The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett
The Accidental Sorcerer by K. E. Mills
High Heat by Lee Child
The Last Hero by Terry Pratchett (graphic novel)
Pirate Latitudes by Michael Crichton (audio book)
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
The Odyssey by Homer, translated by George Herbert Palmer --- hey! finally finished this one!
A Sudden Wild Magic by Diana Wynne Jones
Hexwood by Diana Wynne Jones
The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
The Islands of Chaldea by Diana Wynne Jones and Ursula Jones
The Dog Who Wouldn't Be by Farley Mowat
Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett (reread)
Hollow City by Ransom Riggs
Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett
Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett (reread)
Midnight Riot by Ben Aaronovitch
Moon Over Soho by Ben Aaronovitch
Whispers Underground by Ben Aaronovitch
Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch
Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett (reread)
A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett (reread)
The Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett (reread)
I Shall Wear Midnight by Terry Pratchett (reread)
The Cold Dish:A Longmire Mystery by Craig Johnson
Doughnut by Tom Holt
Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett (reread)
Death Without Company by Craig Johnson
When It's a Jar by Tom Holt
The Battle of Salamis by Barry Strauss (reread)
Maskerade by Terry Pratchett (reread)
Flash Boys by Michael Lewis
Mistborn: the Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson
Personal by Lee Child
Down the Mississippi with Stinky: Two Women, a Canoe, and a Kitten by Dorie Brunner
Paw and Order by Spencer Quinn
Kindness Goes Unpunished by Craig Johnson
The Eye of Zoltar by Jasper Fforde
Varjak Paw by S.F. Said
The Outlaw Varjak Paw by S.F. Said
The Well of Ascension by Brandon Sanderson
The Rithmatist by Brandon Sanderson
The Hero of Ages by Brandon Sanderson
Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson
Ye Gods by Tom Holt
Nothing But Blue Skies by Tom Holt
Last edited by Bad Demographic on Fri Dec 26, 2014 1:52 pm, edited 41 times in total.
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Books Read in 2012
Books Read in 2013
Books Read in 2014
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moghedian
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by moghedian » Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:45 pm

Reading

In Broad Daylight by Harry MacLean (NOOK)

Read

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill (NOOK)
Dover Beach by Richard Bowker (NOOK) -- from their free Friday thing, not too bad
Hater by David Moody (NOOK)
Everything and Nothing by David Moody (NOOK) -- a prequel to the 2nd book in the Hater series, it was free
Dog Blood by David Moody (NOOK)
The Martian by Andy Weir (NOOK)
The Three by Sarah Lotz (NOOK)
Taboo (CSI Reilly Steel #1) by Casey Hill .... (NOOK)
The Heart of Everything That Is: The Untold Story of Red Cloud, An American Legend by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin (NOOK)
The Shroud Key by Vincent Zandri (NOOK) -- thru BookBub
Midnight Harvest (Seasons of Blood #1) by Elias Anderson (NOOK)
She Devours (Seasons of Blood #2) by Elias Anderson (NOOK)
Darkling Spawn (Seasons of Blood #3) by Elias Anderson (NOOK)
Little Deaths by John F.D. Taff (NOOK)
Wolf by Mo Hayder (NOOK)
Last edited by moghedian on Wed Dec 03, 2014 8:02 pm, edited 14 times in total.
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Jeff V
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Jeff V » Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:58 pm

Only 45 read last year, 30 short of the goal of 75. I guess I shall try again this year.

1st quarter note: 21 books, on pace for 84. Woot!
2nd quarter note: 46 books, surpassed last year already, on pace for 92. Double woot!
3rd quarter note: 64 books, 85 book pace.

Read

Inferno by Dan Brown :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Limbus, Inc. by Jonathan Maberry, Joseph Nassise, Anne C. Petty (Editor) :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Twelve by Justin Cronin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Dead Lands by Rick Hautala :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Hidden in Plain Sight: The Other People in Norman Rockwell's America by Jane Allen Petrick :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
A History of Warfare by John Keegan :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Bluffer's Guide to Etiquette (Bluffer's Guides) (edition 2014) by William Hanson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Young Carthaginian (original 1887; edition 2013) by G. A. Henty :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Bluffer's Guide to Chocolate (Bluffer's Guides) (edition 2014) by Neil Davey] :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Pagan Lord by Bernard Cornwell :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Long Walk by Stephen King :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody but Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass by Bill Maher :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Archduke Franz Ferdinand Lives!: A World without World War I by Richard Ned Lebow :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Spilled Blood by Brian Freeman :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Cold Vengeance by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Malicious History: An Investigation into King James VI of Scotland, I of England, and His Place in the History of Witch Hunts by Joe Kasti :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Fever Dream by Lincon Child and Douglas Preston :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England by Dan Jones :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Draco Tavern by Larry Niven :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Battleground Prussia: The Assault on Germany's Eastern Front 1944-45 (General Military) by Prit Buttar :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Empire of Blue Water: Captain Morgan's Great Pirate Army, the Epic Battle for the Americas, and the Catastrophe That Ended the Outlaws' Bloody Reign by Stephan Talty :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Mickey Outside (A White Collar Crime Thriller) by David Lender :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Dangerous Women by George R.R. Martin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Hiking Ohio by Gary Williams :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Pompeii by Robert Harris :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Thunderstruck by Erik Larson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Use Your Brain to Change Your Age: Secrets to Look, Feel, and Think Younger Every Day by Daniel G. Amen M.D. :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Templar Legacy: A Novel (Cotton Malone) by Steve Berry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind by Michio Kaku :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Bluffer's Guide to Food (Bluffer's Guides) by Neil Davey :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Alexandria Link: A Novel (Cotton Malone) by Steve Berry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Jade Sky (A Matt Rowley Novel) by Patrick Freivald :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
After Dark (Vintage International) by Haruki Murakami :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Men of Iron by Howard Pyle :binky: :binky:

The Racketeer: A Novel by John Grisham :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith by Jon Krakauer :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, From A Game of Thrones to A Dance with Dragons by James Lowder :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel by Neil Gaiman :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Mistress by James Patterson, David Ellis :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
I'm a Stranger Here Myself: Notes on Returning to America After 20 Years Away by Bill Bryson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Medium Raw: A Bloody Valentine to the World of Food and the People Who Cook (P.S.) by Anthony Bourdain :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Do the Work by Steven Pressfield :binky: :binky:
Fate of Worlds (Return from the Ringworld) by Larry Niven :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Second Honeymoon by James Patterson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
People I Want to Punch in the Throat: Competitive Crafters, Drop-Off Despots, and Other Suburban Scourges by Jen Mann :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Justinian's Flea: The First Great Plague and the End of the Roman Empire by William Rosen :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Night Heron by Adam Brookes :binky: :binky:
Zoo by James Patterson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls by David Sedaris :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Airframe by Michael Crichton :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Venetian Betrayal by Steve Berry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
If You Ask Me: (And of Course You Won't) by Betty White :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

The Quickie by James Patterson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Unenviable: Stories of Psychological Trauma and Hardship among Immigrants and their Families by David G. Mirich Ph.D. :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Men Who United the States: America's Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics, and Mavericks, and the Creation of One Nation, Indivisible by Simon Winchester (2014) :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Mastering Running (Masters Athlete Series) by Cathy Utzschneider :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Lodger Shakespeare: His Life on Silver Street by Charles Nicholl :binky: :binky:
Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Charlemagne Pursuit: A Novel by Steve Berry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern by Victor Davis Hanson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Paris Vendetta by Steve Berry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Private Down Under by James Patterson and Michael White :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Limbus, Inc. - Book II by Jonathan Maberry :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Clean Eating 28-Day Plan: A Healthy Cookbook and 4-Week Plan for Eating Clean by Rockridge Press :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants by Malcolm Gladwell
:binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman by Robert K. Massie :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Reading

Brandenburg: A Thriller by Glenn Meade



As of 12/20/14 26,486 pages 75 pages per day
Last edited by Jeff V on Sat Dec 20, 2014 6:07 pm, edited 83 times in total.

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tgb
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by tgb » Wed Jan 01, 2014 1:49 pm

Brian wrote:Currently Reading:

Every Day Is An Athiest Holiday - Penn Jillette

Image

Completed Reading:
That looks good. Will read after finishing But He Was Good To His Mother:The Lives and Crimes Of Jewish Gangsters
I spent 90% of the money I made on women, booze, and drugs. The other 10% I just pissed away.


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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by JonathanStrange » Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:51 pm

JANUARY

1. Thinking, Fast and Slow Daniel Kahneman Kindlebook/Audiobook
2. The Stuff of Thought Language As A Window Into Human Nature Steven Pinker Kindlebook
3. Proust and the Squid The Story and Science of the Reading Brain Maryanne Wolf Audiobook
4. Smart Thinking Three Essential Keys to Solve Problems, Innovate, And Get Things Done Art Markman Audiobook
5. You’re Not So Smart David McRaney Audiobook/Kindlebook

6. You Are Not Your Brain The 4 Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life Jeffrey Schwartz
7. The Guardian of All Things The Epic Story of Human Memory Michael S. Malone
8. What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite David DiSalvo
Last edited by JonathanStrange on Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:43 pm, edited 8 times in total.
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Books Read 2013

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The Meal
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by The Meal » Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:59 pm

Completed
Fiction
Timebound (The Chronos Files) Rysa Walker (Amazon lent as of 1/5/2014)
Juvenile time-travel story and the author didn't do herself (or the readers) any favors in terms of clarity (characters sharing identical names, keeping the various time lines straight), but I thought the plot was good enough for me to finish. It's clearly a set-up for additional book(s) in the same sequence, but I wouldn't go out of my way to track them down (nor would I actively avoid them).

The Line (Witching Savannah, Book One) J.D. Horn (Amazon)
Quite possibly the worst piece of fiction I've ever completed. It's another targeted-to-juveniles book with a female protagonist, but this time in the witch-centric world of Savannah, Georgia. The author clearly has an interesting story in mind, but the way he advances the plot is jarring and when he seems to paint himself into the corner the ol' pocket-frannistan of writing gets whipped out. Despite that (or because of that), what are meant to be twists are not clever revelations for the reader. I wanted to loan this one to MHS, but even she refused to take this one from my Amazon lending library.

The Hunger Games Suzanne Collins (borrowed from Amazon's Owner's Lending Library)
Despite having been spoiled by the movie (and following, by my wife who had read the books but was prompted to tell me the differences between the two media versions), this was still a quick and enjoyable read. Collins isn't much one for extraneous details or significant character development or dialog. She's got a story in mind and wants to put it on paper. The teeny-bopper love triangle aspect certainly wasn't the draw for me, but the contrived story about the goings on in the arena was plenty enjoyable. For folks who like seeing this sort of thing play out, I recommend youtubing the Mindcrack Ultra Hardcore ("UHC") Minecraft videos. Currently on Season 14, I found many of these to be well worth my time. Of course, I 1) enjoy Minecraft videos, and 2) understand the interpersonal relationship amongst the Mindcrack members. YMMV.

American Gods Neil Gaiman (Amazon, special thanks to Smoove_B for pointing out a recent sale of modern classics)
The majority of the story is a set-up of the Old Gods (dragged over to America by then-believing immigrants, only to fall out of favor) vs. the "gods" of modern times (such as Media, the Internet, etc.) as told by a bystander dragged into the fight. Since a good 80% of the book has to do with the set-up to the ultimate battle, it's easy for the reader to get lost in the anticipation rather than focus on the allegory involved in the build-up. I'm hesitant to offer a general recommendation as this is no standard plot-centric story driven by action, but rather a story about the journey. I rather enjoy Gaiman's writing style (and found my inner monologue following his same patterns when I was away from the book), which was not overly descriptive while remaining very much based in observation and rewarding those who read deeply rather than only on the surface.

Non–fiction
How to Be a Poker Player: The Philosophy of Poker Haseeb Qureshi (Amazon)
This is from my least favorite genre of poker strategy, "soft" strategy, which mostly discusses mental issues or frameworks to adjust your mindsets when playing or learning. That said, it's easily the best of the bunch from what I've read. The author makes assumptions about the reader (i.e., that you are in your early-to-mid 20's playing online poker) when giving advice (and much of this advice is more in the lifestyle department, how you should eat, exercise, sleep, etc.) and shows a general lack of life experience on many topics. However, when focused on the act of participating in and studying poker the advice is solid. The author is a good writer, which helps. I can't give an unqualified recommendation, but if you struggle with mental aspects of playing poker or if you can't form a mindset for learning new topics (poker-related or otherwise), this book won't hurt. A ding against the author is his participating in one of the online scandals from recent memory, so it'll be difficult to find reviews or discussions of the book that are divorced from that topic.

Poker's 1% - The One Big Secret that Keeps Elite Players on Top Ed Miller (Self-published, EdMillerPoker.com)
Ed Miller has been my favorite poker strategy author for a long time, and so I've vowed to support his endeavors at every turn. When I found out that he was self-publishing this title (following the unfortunate pattern of self-aggrandizing titles in poker strategy literature) I didn't think twice at the price tag. Fortunately for me, by pre-ordering, I was eligible to receive a .pdf version of the book a couple of weeks before it was released for general consumption to folks at large. Without overselling the book, I think it's fair to call it among the most revolutionary books on the market. It does not provide the most revolutionary theory to the game, but it does what Mr. Miller does best, it wraps coherent writing around difficult-to-write-about topics in such a way which brings the cohesive whole to the reader with a minimum of unfortunate side effects. This book could be fairly assessed as a "dumbed down" version of Matthew Janda's Applications of No-Limit Hold em. In a nutshell it provides a reasonable framework for players to utilize a game-theory optimized "frequency-based" strategy to their poker game. It's what I observe when I watch youtube videos of poker savants (such as Jason Somerville) who crafted their games online, but it presents the information in a digestible format which is such an anathema to the "internet kiddies" segment of poker strategy authors. This should not be your first (or fifth) poker strategy book, and I'd highly recommend familiarity with exploitative theories first (start especially with Miller's previous two releases on hand reading and exploitative play), if only to understand why this method is so powerful. If Janda's book was too (unnecessarily) dense for your reading or if you were intrigued by the topics, but wanted more hand-holding to the application of Chen's and Ankenman's The Mathematics of Poker then this is the book for you.
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Bad Demographic » Thu Jan 02, 2014 3:22 pm

Jeff V wrote:Only 45 read last year, 30 short of the goal of 75. I guess I shall try again this year.

Read

Reading

Inferno by Dan Brown
Limbus, Inc. by Jonathan Maberry, Joseph Nassise, Anne C. Petty (Editor)
I read 75 in 2012 - it was too many.
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Books Read in 2012
Books Read in 2013
Books Read in 2014
Books Read in 2015

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by El Guapo » Thu Jan 02, 2014 3:27 pm

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Cylus Maxii » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:25 pm

Finished:
Currently Reading:
  • The Hunger Games (Collins)
    Shards of Honor (Bujold)
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by theohall » Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:48 pm

Catching Fire - Suzanne Collins
Mockingjay - Suzanne Collins
Offworld - Robin Parrish
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Crazy Lady » Sun Jan 05, 2014 5:43 pm

1/6/14-Started NOS4A2 by Joe Hill



Finished:
Port Mortuary by Patricia Cornwell.
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by wire » Sun Jan 05, 2014 7:02 pm

I haven't participated in previous books read threads...trying to be more active in 2014 :)

Currently Reading:
S by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst
Tough Sh*t: Life Advice from a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good by Kevin Smith
Dresden Files: Grave Peril by Jim Butcher

Finished:
Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living by Nick Offerman
Enjoyed Nick's book as it was interesting reading his journey to where he is today. It's filled with swear words, sex, masturbation, meat eating, drugs and so forth...if you expected him to be Ron Swanson in real life you'll be sorely disappointed. He has some of the same hobbies (woodworking, saxophone, meat eating and so on) but that's about it.
Quentin Tarantino: Cinema Of Cool Film by Jeff Dawson
If you haven't watch any of Tarantino's earlier movies you may want to not read this book as it contains lots of spoilers.
The Complete Sherlock Holmes Stories
Started this last year and just finished it recently. This set is all 4 novels and 56 short stories.
Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and The People Who Play It by David M. Ewalt
Dresden Files: Storm Front by Jim Butcher
Dresden Files: Fool Moon by Jim Butcher
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by MHS » Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:29 pm

Read:
Thunderhead by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child. I read all the Pendergast series books by these guys last year and liked them, so went looking for more in that vein. The non-Pendergast books aren't as good, but this one was entertaining enough that I bought another.

Riptide by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child. Bought for reasons noted above, but this one was a chore to slog through. I probably won't get another one of their books until the next Pendergast in the series.

Timebound by Rysa Walker, loaned from The Meal. Decent enough. Unlike Neal, I'll likely seek out the sequel(s).

Burning Man by Alan Russell. Enjoyed this, enough that I bought another by the same author. He was a little too heavy on the oh-so-witty repartee but I enjoy banter so it was ok. If he toned it done by about 20%, I'd probably pick up all of his books for when I want a quick and easy crime novel.

Multiple Wounds by Alan Russell. A story of a murder witness with dissociative identity disorder, most of her personalities from Greek mythology. I will end of buying all his books, but need a short break.

House of Bathory by Linda Lafferty. Historical fiction that weaves modern times and 17th century storylines regarding Elizabeth Bathory, a real life countess who tortured and murdered many of her servants and is thought to be part of the basis for vampires, as well as possibly related to Vlad the Impaler. Interesting, not fascinating. Not particularly well written but it was ok.

The Definitive H.P. Lovecraft: 67 Tales of Horror by HP Lovecraft

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion. Don Tillman, genetics professor with Aspergers-like tendencies, develops a Wife Project to meet the perfect wife. Rosie meets none of the criteria of the project so obviously they fall in love. Clearly written with an eye for the big screen, it's quick and cute, but fairly insulting and a step back for mental illness in that it appears to promote the idea that simply falling in love will enable you to "get over" your Asperger's syndrome.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nightime by Mark Haddon. Has been on my reading list for almost a decade. Murder-mystery of a dog told from the perspective of an autistic teenager. Obviously less about the "mystery" than the people. Decent book, well-written.

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple. Genius ex-architect Bernadette Fox disappears, leaving her family to reconstruct the events leading up to his point in their lives. A skewering of Seattle and Microsoft as much as anything else. Cruise ship/vacation reading.

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. Chick lit about a caregiver who falls in love with her quadriplegic patient. Cruise ship/vacation reading.

Gilded by Christina Farley. YA novel about a Korean girl who discovers she's next in line of a family curse going back generations and documented in Korean mythology. Cruise ship/vacation reading.

Reading
Last edited by MHS on Tue Feb 11, 2014 6:03 pm, edited 11 times in total.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Jeff V » Tue Jan 07, 2014 9:18 pm

MHS wrote: Riptide by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child. Bought for reasons noted above, but this one was a chore to slog through. I probably won't get another one of their books until the next Pendergast in the series.
I read this last year, went to look up my review and discovered I neglected to review it! :oops: So I guess I read 46 books last year. I thought it was on-par with the other Preston/Child books, although the pacing could have been a little better. They spent too much time fleshing out characters that died early.

Maybe you should try the Gideon's books (Gideon's Sword, Gideon's Corpse). I also realized I didn't review Gideon's Corpse which I read last summer (47, woohoo! Maybe I made my goal of 75 after all and just neglected to record it!) I found them at least as entertaining as the Pendergast books.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Jeff V » Wed Jan 08, 2014 7:33 pm

Inferno by Dan Brown :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

I've read other books based on Dante's hysterical Divine Comedy, although most usually follow the script laid out in the first of the three part poem and just tweak it to a particular setting or theme. In this case, Dan Brown tells us about the life of Dante, and his legacy provides clues as for a scholar suffering short-term memory loss and the most brilliant woman in the world as they evade assassins while trying to figure out exactly what is going on. The result is a James Bond-like tale. unlikely turns and baffling twists (why would an evil genius go through such trouble to set up a Rube Goldberg like series of events?) Check your brain at the door, but leave it open a crack and you'll get at least a little flavor of Florence, both Renaissance and modern, Venice, and Istanbul.

Without giving spoilers, the ending is somewhat anticlimactic and drags on longer than it should. The main characters chase a series of clues left by an evil genius who recently committed suicide after setting his plan in motion. The horrible climax, however, is not just in what is done (which probably would only enrage Catholics) but in the possibilities it represents. A theoretical finale is not what I was expecting after so much action.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Pyperkub » Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:39 pm

Finished:

Red Seas under Red Skies (Locke Lamora #2) - not sure how into this I am. It hasn't grabbed me like the first one yet. - Update after finishing - meh. Middle 3rd of Piracy was ok, but on the whole the caper didn't matter at all to me, and while the rogue-ish charm of Locke and Jean is still there, the parts I liked best about the first (Bondsmage conflict/resolution and Crooked Warden ideal/ideas) were mostly missing. Not sure if I'll read #3. Have to look at reviews and wait for the price to become reasonable.

The Black Box - Michael Connelly's latest Harry Bosch book
The Gods of Guilt - Michael Connelly's latest Lincoln Lawyer book

Of the two, I'd recommend the Gods of Guilt first. Both are solid Connelly books, but the Bosch books have become such procedural, by the numbers plots that I'm a bit tired of. Connelly used to throw some really great twists into his books, which would require you to rethink everything you thought you knew. Now, most of his books are pretty straightforward police procedurals. Well written with pretty good characters, but straightforward.

Horns - Joe Hill

This was fun one. Clever idea with some decent writing. Joe Hill (Stephen King's son) is getting better and better at this and seems to be bringing some fresh ideas to the genre.

Currently Reading:

Doctor Sleep - Stephen King (time to compare the father and son, back to back and maybe to back if I decide on NOS4A2 next...).
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by McNutt » Thu Jan 09, 2014 2:32 pm

Promise of Blood

The setting for this fantasy novel is a world similar to early 19th-century Europe where soldiers had rifles. However there is magic present in this world and armies are bolstered by Privileges who are able to cast powerful spells, and the misshapen Wardens who were created through sorcery and can deliver and absorb incredible amounts of damage. There are also powder mages who are riflemen that have the ability to ingest gunpowder to greatly enhance their abilities. The story opens as General Tamas, a powerful powder mage, has just staged a coup against the king and is troubled by the last words of each of the king’s dying Privileged, a cryptic reference to an ancient deity. He sends his best investigator to decipher that message while he tries to restore order to the country and avoid a war with its strong neighbor.

A Promise of Blood is the first in a planned trilogy by a new author. This is a very solid novel and is also around $2 for the Kindle. The next novel is scheduled to have a normal price, but I enjoyed this one enough to get the second as soon as it comes out. The story is good and the characters are great. I'm always on the lookout for new fantasy novels and this is one I highly recommend.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by WYBaugh » Thu Jan 09, 2014 3:16 pm

McNutt wrote:Promise of Blood

The setting for this fantasy novel is a world similar to early 19th-century Europe where soldiers had rifles. However there is magic present in this world and armies are bolstered by Privileges who are able to cast powerful spells, and the misshapen Wardens who were created through sorcery and can deliver and absorb incredible amounts of damage. There are also powder mages who are riflemen that have the ability to ingest gunpowder to greatly enhance their abilities. The story opens as General Tamas, a powerful powder mage, has just staged a coup against the king and is troubled by the last words of each of the king’s dying Privileged, a cryptic reference to an ancient deity. He sends his best investigator to decipher that message while he tries to restore order to the country and avoid a war with its strong neighbor.

A Promise of Blood is the first in a planned trilogy by a new author. This is a very solid novel and is also around $2 for the Kindle. The next novel is scheduled to have a normal price, but I enjoyed this one enough to get the second as soon as it comes out. The story is good and the characters are great. I'm always on the lookout for new fantasy novels and this is one I highly recommend.
Read it in 2013. Excellent book that I highly recommend.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by El Guapo » Thu Jan 09, 2014 3:20 pm

For some reason the title bothers me. I really want a Promise of Non-Blood.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by McNutt » Thu Jan 09, 2014 6:10 pm

WYBaugh wrote: Read it in 2013. Excellent book that I highly recommend.
Looking back I see that it was your recommendation in the 2013 thread that got me to purchase the book. Much appreciated.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by MHS » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:51 am

Jeff V wrote: Maybe you should try the Gideon's books (Gideon's Sword, Gideon's Corpse). I also realized I didn't review Gideon's Corpse which I read last summer (47, woohoo! Maybe I made my goal of 75 after all and just neglected to record it!) I found them at least as entertaining as the Pendergast books.
I've read them. I liked them better than the stand-alones but not quite as much as the Pendergasts.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by YellowKing » Sat Jan 11, 2014 7:50 pm

1/12 - The Well of Ascension: Book 2 of the Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson - Rating (4 out of 5) - I was a little late to the Mistborn party, but I've been trying to catch up. A great sequel to the first book which goes in a rather different direction.

1/19 - Abominable Science! Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids by Daniel Loxton and Donald R. Protherto. Rating (4 out of 5) - See my review elsewhere in this thread, but I really enjoyed this one.

1/21 - In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin by Erik Larson Rating (3 out of 5) - I've been a big fan of Larson's other books, but this one was rather disappointing. Telling the tale of the American ambassador to Germany during Hitler's rise to power, the biggest flaw in this book is that Larson picked such an uninteresting individual as his subject. While the descriptions of Germany's descent into madness are fascinating, nothing much actually happened to this family to make them worthy of wrapping a book around. Larson might have been better served just picking out a tree in the middle of Berlin and using that as his centerpiece. I give it a 3 only because I found most of the non-ambassador stuff interesting and informative.

1/24 - Between Man & Beast: An Unlikely Explorer and the African Adventure That Took the Victorian World By Storm by Monte Reel (4 out of 5) - It's hard to imagine that there was a time when nobody in civilized society even knew what a gorilla looked like. This is the story of Paul Du Chaillu, who ventured into the heart of Africa to expose these creatures to the world. It's also the story of the rampant racism of the 1800s and the battle of science vs religion. Very entertaining account of the men who, despite their flaws, advanced biology and science by risking their own lives and reputations.

1/26 - Psycho: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Thriller by Janet Leigh and Christopher Nickens (2 out of 5) - I've had this one on my shelf for quite awhile, and finally got around to reading it. No big surprises are revealed here for those who know their horror films, but Janet Leigh does clear up a few common misconceptions about the filming. Unfortunately the book is a bit of a rambling mess, more of a conversation than a structured narrative, and Leigh spends more time praising her costars and Hitchcock than she does relating interesting anecdotes. It's a quick, light read and if you're a fan of the film (who isn't?) it's worth checking out. Just don't expect many in-depth revelations.

2/9 - The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi (4 out of 5) - The strange story of one of Italy's most famous serial killers and the justice system that to this day has not brought the real killer to light. In the early 2000s author Douglas Preston moved to Italy with his family and became caught up in the case of the Monster of Florence. What starts out as a bit of journalistic curiosity turns into a nightmarish web of corruption, ineptitude, and suspicion. I always had a fascination with serial killer stories, and this is one I had never heard about. Picked this one up just because I'm a fan of Preston's Pendergast novels, but this true life story is every bit as riveting as his fiction.

2/18 - Hiding the Elephant by Jim Steinmeyer (3.5 out of 5) - I've always been interested in magic and magicians, so I picked this up on a whim. The author takes you through the history of the golden age of magic, offering stories and anecdotes of all of the major conjurers from the late 1800s through the early 1900s. Along the way you get fascinating histories of such popular illusions as Pepper's Ghost, Sawing a Woman in Half, the popular Spiritualism cons of the time, etc. There is also particular emphasis on the use of mirrors in illusions (honestly I knew magicians used mirrors, but not quite to what extent). I took off half a star just because the book does bog down in spots, and the way Steinmeyer jumps from magician to magician can sometimes get confusing. Still, if you're a fan of a way of magic you don't see much anymore, it's well worth a read.

3/4 - Doctor Sleep by Stephen King (4 out of 5) - I'm a huge Stephen King fan so this was high on my most anticipated this year. While it didn't utterly blow me away, it's still a solid King novel with sympathetic characters, some decent chills, and a lot of heart. I also particularly enjoyed the fact that the first part of the book takes place in my actual hometown - King has been here quite a bit while filming Under the Dome and it was cool to see him weave this city into the narrative (even if it wasn't exactly in the best light :D ).

3/31 - The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch (3.5 out of 5) - Third in the fantasy series about thief Locke Lamora and his brutish pal Jean, this entry was a slight disappointment compared to the previous two. While Lynch's writing and dialogue is still brilliantly entertaining, the plot this time around divides its time between two narratives - one modern day and one set in Locke's youth. Unfortunately both narratives suffer due to this back and forth, and the emphasis this time around on Locke's romance with fellow thief Sabetha bogs things down. Towards the end of the book I felt the same way a friend might feel towards a lovesick buddy - just hook up or STFU, because I'm tired of hearing about it. Still, a mediocre Scott Lynch novel is still better than a lot of fantasy books out there, and there were some major plot advancements that are important to the series as a whole.

5/25 - Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell (4 out of 5) - I became a fan of Karen Russell after reading her novel Swamplandia!, and was interested to see what she brought to short story form. I wasn't disappointed. While most of the tales left a lot to the reader to puzzle out, each was full of her signature quirkiness that sometimes bordered on horror. These are stories that will stick in your mind for awhile after you put the book down.

6/27/14 - Halo: The Fall of Reach - Eric Nylund (3 1/2 out of 5) - I started reading the Halo novels in preparation for the Master Chief collection coming out this fall for the XB1, and because a Halo fan at work told me they were actually pretty decent for video game books. While The Fall of Reach wouldn't win any awards for plot complexity, the story was fun, fast-paced, and made the Covenant much scarier than they seem in the game.

8/14/14 - A Memory of Light - Book 14 of The Wheel of Time - Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson (4 out of 5) - Wow. Very strange to finish, at nearly 40 years old, a series I started in my early 20s. While the focus on battle/war grew a little wearisome, I give Sanderson credit for writing a satisfactory ending to the series. Suitably epic ending to a series that - while it had its ups and downs - was certainly one of the most memorable fantasy worlds I've ever visited.

8/23/14 - American Sniper - Chris Kyle (4 out of 5) - Quick but excellent read that gives an insight into the mind of a Navy Seal on the front lines of war. Chris is obviously not a professional writer, but the conversational tone of the autobiography does more to give insight into his personality and the realities on the ground in Iraq than any professional writer could give justice. Great read for any "armchair quarterbacks" who think all our enemies can be dealt with diplomatically. Sometimes the only thing that persuades change is a bullet between the eyes.

8/30/14 - Jump the Shark: When Good Things Go Bad - Jon Hein (2 out of 5) - This was a result of my attempt to finish off a lot of the hardcovers I have lying around that I want to get rid of. This book is by the guy who coined the phrase "jumped the shark" referring to the point at which a TV series takes a turn for the worse. Each chapter points out when the subject "jumped the shark" and the reason behind its downfall. While the gimmick is entertaining for a good bit, the book gets really dry when they try to apply the phrase to musicians, politicians, and sports teams. Do yourself a favor and just hit the website, which is far more entertaining (and more up to date!)
Last edited by YellowKing on Wed Sep 03, 2014 10:44 pm, edited 21 times in total.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Godzilla Blitz » Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:39 am

Finished Ranger's Apprentice: Ruins of Gorlan.

Trying to read some of the books my kids are reading, and my son loved this one. It's a fast, light YA read but I actually enjoyed it quite a bit. A few issues with pacing, but the story is compelling enough and the characters interesting enough for me to keep going with the series.
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Carpet_pissr » Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:59 am

Read Ender's Game and Speaker For the Dead in late 2013, and finishing up now(about halfway through) with Xenocide.

The first one is obviously spectacular, I don't think anything else needs to be said since it's so well-known. Definitely tends to action, and plot moves along at a quick pace. "Speaker", I thought was equally amazing, but for completely different reasons. Much less action, more philosophy, and made me think a hellofa lot while I was reading it. Love that.

Xenocide is slow going for me, though, and I feel like I am forcing myself to finish it. Just now realized this is a QUINTET and not a trilogy! Doh! As much as I enjoyed the first two I read, I doubt I will go back now and track down the remaining two in the series though...kind of burned out on this universe for now, and the plodding of Xenocide is not making me enthusiastic.

Reading concurrently: Gaiman's Sandman and "Watchmen"

Next up: "The Reason I Jump", by Naoki Higashida

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Isgrimnur » Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:05 am

She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth by Helen Castor

This was a good read and focused on the lives of Empress Matilda, Eleanor of Aquitaine, and Margaret of Anjou. You get a good look at where they were from, the players in their lives, and their impacts on those around them. It's a good attempt to personify these women who are seen, a lot of times, as just another set of royal names on the chessboard of history. It's enough to intrigue me that I want to do more reading at a higher level about the history of England and Europe during that period to get a better feel for their parents, husbands, children.

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by coopasonic » Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:12 am

Carpet_pissr wrote:Xenocide is slow going for me, though, and I feel like I am forcing myself to finish it. Just now realized this is a QUINTET and not a trilogy! Doh! As much as I enjoyed the first two I read, I doubt I will go back now and track down the remaining two in the series though...kind of burned out on this universe for now, and the plodding of Xenocide is not making me enthusiastic.
I think Ender in Exile is a different story. Children of the Mind closes the storyline.

The Shadow Series is better.
-Coop

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Carpet_pissr » Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:33 am

coopasonic wrote:
Carpet_pissr wrote:Xenocide is slow going for me, though, and I feel like I am forcing myself to finish it. Just now realized this is a QUINTET and not a trilogy! Doh! As much as I enjoyed the first two I read, I doubt I will go back now and track down the remaining two in the series though...kind of burned out on this universe for now, and the plodding of Xenocide is not making me enthusiastic.
Children of the Mind closes the storyline.
Crap. So I guess I need to read ONE more, then. :D

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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by tgb » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:42 am

Finished But He Was Good To His Mother and moving on to the Penn Jillette book Brian was reading.
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by A nonny mouse » Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:43 pm

Finished Speaker for the Dead - Orson Scott Card. I wouldn't even have known about the 4-logy but a volunteer and I were discussing books and I had mentioned that I read a few in (what I now know as) the other series. I guess Ender's game, Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide and the 4th (Children of the mind) where his intended "trilogy" for Ender. I had forgotten how good his writing was ( I agree with Carpet_pissr "Speaker" is a realy good book). - I read ender's game a loooong time ago. I am taking a break for Xenocide and :

Currently reading:

Spin - as recommended in the science fiction thread.
Benjamin Franklin: An american life - Walter Isaacson
A dance with Dragons - GRRM
Spillover - David Quammen

All very good so far, and I read a few concurrently just in case one gets slow.

*edit because fingers don't do what brain wants
Last edited by A nonny mouse on Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I find television very educational. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

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$iljanus
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by $iljanus » Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:54 pm

tgb wrote:Finished But He Was Good To His Mother and moving on to the Penn Jillette book Brian was reading.
How was But He Was Good To His Mother? After watching Mob City I was a bit curious about Meyer Lansky, Bugsy and the Jewish mob. Especially Lansky since he and Lucky Luciano were instrumental in bringing a bit of organizing to the endeavor of crime.
tl;dr

Wise words of warning from Smoove B: Oh, how you all laughed when I warned you about the semen. Well, who's laughing now?

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Carpet_pissr
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by Carpet_pissr » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:36 pm

A nonny mouse wrote:( I agree with Carpet_pissr "Children" is a realy good book).
Just to clarify, I haven't read "Children" yet...still deciding whether I will or not, or skip it and just read Ender's Shadow instead.

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WYBaugh
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by WYBaugh » Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:28 pm

McNutt wrote:
WYBaugh wrote: Read it in 2013. Excellent book that I highly recommend.
Looking back I see that it was your recommendation in the 2013 thread that got me to purchase the book. Much appreciated.
Sweet! I'm glad some of my posts can help. Have you checked out Blood Song? Amazingly good read for a book that was originally self-published.

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A nonny mouse
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Re: Books Read 2014

Post by A nonny mouse » Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:50 pm

Carpet_pissr wrote:
A nonny mouse wrote:( I agree with Carpet_pissr "Children" is a realy good book).
Just to clarify, I haven't read "Children" yet...still deciding whether I will or not, or skip it and just read Ender's Shadow instead.
Sorry. I meant speaker for the dead.
I find television very educational. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

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