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Books Read 2011

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lildrgn
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Books Read 2011

Post by lildrgn » Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:09 am

Let's rock. Here's the 2010 one: LINK

Read
1. The Likeness by Tana French (Kindle)
2. Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist (Kindle)
3. Catch Me If You Can by Frank W. Abagnale (Kindle)
4. Faithful Place by Tana French (Kindle)
5. Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan (Kindle)
6. High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Kindle)
7. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Kindle)
8. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly (Kindle)
9. The King of Plagues by Jonathan Maberry (Kindle)
10. Gideon's Sword by Preston/Child (Kindle)
11. The Zero Game by Brad Meltzer (Kindle)
12. The Ghosts of Belfast by Stuart Neville (book!)
13. Collusion by Stuart Neville (Kindle)
14. Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar (Kindle)
15. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (Kindle)
16. Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales (Kindle)
17. The Lock Artist by Steve Hamilton (Kindle)
18. A Cold Day in Paradise by Steve Hamilton (Kindle)
19. The Terror of Living by Urban Waite (Kindle)
20. The Leopard by Jo Nesbo (Kindle)
21. Cold Vengeance by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child (Kindle)
22. Headhunters by Jo Nesbo (Kindle)
23. Stolen Souls by Stuart Neville (Kindle)
24. War by Sebastian Junger (Kindle)
25. Cherry Bomb by J.A. Konrath (Kindle)
26. The Killing Moon by Chuck Hogan (Kindle)
27. The Drop by Michael Connelly (Kindle)
28. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
29. Fallen by Karin Slaughter
30. Agent 6 by Tom Rob Smith
31. Room by Emma Donoghue

Now Reading:
Carte Blanche by Jeffrey Deaver

DNF
Ordinary Thunderstorms by William Boyd (Kindle)
The Strain by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan (Kindle)
The Inside of a Dog (Kindle)
Last edited by lildrgn on Tue Jan 03, 2012 3:12 am, edited 26 times in total.
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Grundbegriff
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Grundbegriff » Sun Jan 02, 2011 2:22 am

Read or Re-read
  • Decision Points
  • Six Greek Comedies
  • The Hobbit
  • Seam in Action
  • Java Reflection in Action
  • Houdini -- the Key
  • Agile Development & Business Goals: The Six Week Solution
  • Practical Clojure
  • Logic, Bivalence, and Denotation
  • Dreaming in Chinese
  • ...
Last edited by Grundbegriff on Wed Feb 16, 2011 7:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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disarm
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by disarm » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:39 am

i've never participated in these threads before because i've been too busy to read much for a while.  i've found more time in the last few months, picked up a Kindle, and have been on a roll ever since.  let's see where this year goes...

Finished

A Feast for Crows - George R.R. Martin - January ?
Yao & Artusio's Anesthesiology: Problem Oriented Patient Management - 1,400 pages over 3 months, studying for my anesthesiology board exams (passed!)
The Walking Dead, Issues 1-12 - Robert Kirkman - May 8
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo - Stieg Larsson - May 13
This Is Gonna Hurt - Nikki Sixx - May 16
The Walking Dead, Issues 13-24 - Robert Kirkman - May 19
The Walking Dead, Issues 25-36 - Robert Kirkman - May 22
The Walking Dead, Issues 37-48 - Robert Kirkman - May 26
The Walking Dead, Issues 49-60 - Robert Kirkman - May 28
The Walking Dead, Issues 61-72 - Robert Kirkman - June 3
The Girl Who Played With Fire - Stieg Larsson - July 5
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest - Stieg Larsson - July 7
A Dance with Dragons - George R.R. Martin - August 7
Harry Potter & The Sorcerer's Stone - J.K. Rowling - August 14
Harry Potter & The Chamber of Secrets - J.K. Rowling - August 23
Harry Potter & The Prisoner of Azkaban - J.K. Rowling - September 1
Harry Potter & The Goblet of Fire - J.K. Rowling - September 16
Harry Potter & The Order of the Phoenix - J.K. Rowling - September 28
Harry Potter & The Half-Blood Prince - J.K. Rowling - October 6
Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows - J.K. Rowling - October 14
The Walking Dead, Issues 73-84 - Robert Kirkman - October 31
Watch You Bleed - The Saga of Guns 'n' Roses - Stephen Davis - December 6
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole - December 23
Ready Player One - Ernest Cline - December 25
The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins - December 29
Catching Fire - Suzanne Collins - December 31


In Progress
Last edited by disarm on Sun Jan 01, 2012 2:31 am, edited 21 times in total.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Isgrimnur » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:49 am

Last edited by Isgrimnur on Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:51 pm, edited 26 times in total.
Silver - soon...

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JoeMoustache
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by JoeMoustache » Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:59 am

I quit on last year's post. Maybe this year will be different.

Currently Reading -

Why Evolution is True - Jerry Coyne

Finished -

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by rshetts2 » Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:04 am

Currently Reading:

The Black Prism - by Brent Weeks

Not too far in but this is a very entertaining fantasy. I like the unique magic system Weeks is developing. Based on the light spectrum, magic is performed by altering a specific color of the spectrum into luxim, basically converting energy into malleable matter. Unlike most fantasy, magic use is quite common in this world but most are able to only alter one color of the spectrum. More unique are the Polychromes who can alter light in 2 and even 3 color spectrums. Once in a generation, there is born a Prism, a person who can "draft" in all colors of the spectrum.

Anyway its the 1st of the Lightbringer series and it looks to be a fun ride.
Well do you ever get the feeling that the story's too damn real and in the present tense?
Or that everybody's on the stage and it seems like you're the only person sitting in the audience?

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Z-Corn
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Z-Corn » Sun Jan 02, 2011 11:04 am

I'll play this year!


Currently Reading:



Finished:

Suicide Hill by James Ellroy

Clandestine by James Ellroy
Last edited by Z-Corn on Sun Jan 23, 2011 8:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Odin
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Odin » Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:46 pm

I may give this a shot this year. I kind of doubt I'll stick with it, but I'll try.

I'm currently on my 3rd or 4th attempt to read the books after the original Dune. I'm on Dune Messiah. The Brian Hebert/Kevin Anderson books have hopefully filled in enough gaps and expanded on the universe enough for me to finally find these books interesting.

The List:
Dune Messiah (Frank Herbert)
Children of Dune (Frank Herbert)
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief (Rick Riordan)
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: Sea of Monsters (Rick Riordan)
Kenpo Karate: The Law of the Fist and the Empty Hand (Ed Parker)
God Emperor of Dune (Frank Herbert) - it sucked
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Titan's Curse (Rick Riordan)
A Game of Thrones (George R. R. Martin)
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Battle of the Labyrinth (Rick Riordan)
A Clash of Kings (George R. R. Martin)
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Last Olympian (Rick Riordan)
The Hunger Games (Suzanne Collins)
A Storm of Swords (George R. R. Martin)
Catching Fire (Suzanne Collins)
Mockingjay (Suzanne Collins)
A Feast for Crows (George R. R. Martin) - read twice
A Dance with Dragons (George R. R. Martin)
Japanese Swordsmanship: Technique And Practice (Gordon Warner & Donn F. Draeger)
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (J. K. Rowling)
Armor (John Steakley)
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (J. K. Rowling)
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (J. K. Rowling)
The Fall (Guillermo del Toro & Chuck Hogan)
I, Robot (Isaac Asimov)
The Passage (Justin Cronin)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (J. K. Rowling)
Ed Parker's Infinite Insights into Kenpo Vol1 (Ed Parker)
Semper Mars (Ian Douglas)
Last edited by Odin on Tue Dec 27, 2011 8:46 am, edited 16 times in total.

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Bad Demographic
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Bad Demographic » Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:11 pm

Currently reading:
The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

Read:
Unseen Academicals by Terry Pratchett
The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson
Seventy-Seven Clocks by Christopher Fowler
Thereby Hangs a Tail by Spencer Quinn
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest by Stieg Larsson
Count Geiger's Blues by Michael Bishop
Hogfather by Terry Pratchett
Worth Dying For by Lee Child
Tongues of Serpents by Naomi Novik
Tea Time for the Traditionally Built by Alexander McCall Smith
Witch Week by Diana Wynne Jones
The Game by Diana Wynne Jones
Nick and the Glimmung by Philip K. Dick
Bridge of Birds by Barry Hughart (re-read)
Touch of Dead by Charlaine Harris
Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris
Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett (re-read)
Three Bags Full by Leonie Swann (re-read)
White Corridor by Christopher Fowler
Knit, Purl, Die by Anne Canadeo
The Victoria Vanishes by Christopher Fowler
Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
Bryant & May On the Loose by Christopher Fowler
Bryant & May Off the Rails by Christopher Fowler
Black Bodies and Quantum Cats by Jennifer Ouellette
The Magicians by Lev Grossman
Carpe Jugulum by Terry Pratchett
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
Charmed Life by Diana Wynne Jones
The Lives of Christopher Chant by Diana Wynne Jones
The Pinhoe Egg by Diana Wynne Jones
The Enchanted Glass by Diana Wynne Jones
The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall Smith
Hard-Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World by Haruki Murakami
The Magician King by Lev Grossman
Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss
To Fetch A Thief by Spencer Quinn
Archer's Goon by Diana Wynne Jones
Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett
The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett
The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett
A Hat Full of Stars by Terry Pratchett
Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett
One of Our Thursdays is Missing by Jasper Fforde
The Dog Who Knew Too Much by Spencer Quinn
Seldom Disappointed by Tony Hillerman
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Last edited by Bad Demographic on Thu Dec 29, 2011 10:37 pm, edited 40 times in total.
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Books Read in 2012
Books Read in 2013
Books Read in 2014
Books Read in 2015

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Lassr
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Lassr » Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:16 pm

The Strain-Del Toro & Hogan 9*
Beneath a Winter Moon -Shawson M. Herbert 5*
Jakarta Pandemic -Steven Konkoly 6*
Apocalypse of the Dead-Joe McKinney 7*
The Fall-Del Toro & Hogan7*
The Invasion-William Meikle 4*
Island Life-William Meikle 2*
Mad Swine: The Beginning: A Zombie Thriller-Steven Pajak 5*

Reading:
Terror-Dan Simmons
Last edited by Lassr on Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:24 pm, edited 12 times in total.
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Jeff V
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Sun Jan 02, 2011 6:28 pm

Read
Shakespeare: The World as a Stage by Bill Bryson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Ashes of Worlds by Kevin J. Anderson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Empires of the Sea: The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the World by Roger Crowley :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Passage by Justin Cronin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Attila - The Gathering of the Storm by William Napier :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Wikinomics - How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything by Don Tapscott :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
ReWork by Jason Fried :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Smart Policies for Workplace Technology: Email, Blogs, Cell Phones & More by Lisa Guerin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Autobiography of Mark Twain Vol. 1 :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman by Timothy Ferriss :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Attila: The Judgment by William Napier :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms,and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories by Simon Winchester :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Escape from Hell by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Dare to Try...Kama Sutra by Axterdam :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Norse Warfare: Unconventional Battle Strategies of the Ancient Viking by Martina Sprague :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Outlaw by Angus Donald :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Philippine Fever by Bruce Cook :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Blink - The Power of Thinking without Thinking by Malcom Gladwell :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Change Anything: The New Science of Personal Success by Kerry Patterson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Bolivar - The South American Liberator by Robert Harvey :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Age of Attila: Fifth-century Byzantium and the Barbarians by Colin D Gordon :binky: :binky:
Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us by Joe Palca and Flora Lictman :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Dreamcatcher by Stephen King :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Pirate Hunter: The True Story of Captain Kidd by Richard Zacks :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Global Climate Change: The Book of Essential Knowledge by Ernest Zebrowski :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today by David Clark :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Oh Pure and Radiant Heart by Lydia Millet :binky: :binky: :binky:
Distance Cycling by John Hughes and Dan Kehlenbach :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Sex Lives of Cannibals by J. Martin Troost :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Brain Bugs: How the Brain's Flaws Shape Our Lives by Dean Buonomano :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Wheel of Darkness by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Insatiable: Tales from a Life of Delicious Excess by Gael Greene :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
50/50 Secrets I Learned Running 50 Marathons in 50 Days by Dean Karnazes :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge by Max Brockman (ed) :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
A Dance with Dragons by George RR Martin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Lazy Project Manager by Peter Taylor :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Rape of the Muse by Michael Stein :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France by David Andress :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Arguably - Essays by Christopher Hitchens :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
Bike Snob: Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning the World of Cycling by Christopher Koelle :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:
The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True by Richard Dawkins :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Reading
Socrates: A Man for Our Times by Paul Johnson
Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life of Walter Payton by Jeff Pearlman
God, No!: Signs You May Already Be an Atheist and Other Magical Tales by Penn Jillette
Last edited by Jeff V on Sun Nov 06, 2011 10:19 am, edited 48 times in total.

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tru1cy
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by tru1cy » Sun Jan 02, 2011 6:54 pm

Finished

Gaunt's Ghost: The First and Only


On deck
The Cardinal of the Kremlin
House of Chains: Book IV of the Malazan Series
Night Bringer
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theohall
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by theohall » Sun Jan 02, 2011 7:04 pm

Read:
Storm Front - Jim Butcher
Fool Moon - Jim Butcher
Grave Peril - Jim Butcher
Summer Knight - Jim Butcher
A Mighty Fortress - David Weber
The Dragon's Path - Daniel Abraham
Mission of Honor - David Weber
The Name of the Wind - Patrick Rothfuss (read this one faster than the Dragon's Path.)
Wise Man's Fear - Patrick Rothfuss
The Sunset Warrior - Eric Van Lustbader
Shallows of the Night - Eric Van Lustbader
Dai-San - Eric Van Lustbader
Death Masks - Jim Butcher
Game of Thrones

Reading:
Clash of Kings - George R. R. Martin

To Read:
The rest of the Dresden Files since all the books are in the house.
Re-read ASoIF since A Dance with Dragons is done.
Re-read WoT since that series will likely finish with Sanderson concluding it.
Also re-read of The Sunset Warrior Cycle since I've discovered there is a fifth book which apparently was released in 1998.
Last edited by theohall on Sun Aug 14, 2011 10:29 am, edited 8 times in total.

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ChaoZ
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by ChaoZ » Sun Jan 02, 2011 7:43 pm

Finished:
On Basilisk Station - David Weber (Honorverse #1)
The Honor of the Queen - David Weber (Honorverse #2)
The Short Victorious War - David Weber (Honorverse #3)
Field of Dishonor - David Weber (Honorverse #4)
Flag in Exile - David Weber (Honorverse #5)

Reading:
Honor Among Enemies - David Weber (Honorverse #6)
Last edited by ChaoZ on Sun Feb 13, 2011 2:35 pm, edited 4 times in total.

Jeff V
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Sun Jan 02, 2011 9:58 pm

Shakespeare: The World as Stage by Bill Bryson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Bryson is known for taking on huge, sweeping topics and approaching it in an affable, if shallow, manner. Shakespeare: The World as Stage is quite a bit more focused, and considerably less casual than the other books of his I've read.

The life of William Shakespeare is maddeningly undocumented; long frustrating scholars given the prodigious output that survives. There has been a lot of searching but not much finding, but that doesn't keep researchers from putting forth increasingly implausible theories. What Bryson does accomplish is debunking many of these theories, or at least expose them for the rantings of the lunatic fringe. In the meantime, we are reminded of what is really known about Shakespeare; and what can be inferred by clues contained within the texts of his plays. Shakespeare was a notoriously poor historian, yet he had an affinity of adopting contemporary events into his plays. This allows us to piece together probable time lines, sufficient enough to derail some theories.

In the end, we know a little more of his times: the changing political climate that had a real affect on the staging of plays, and Shakespeare's contemporaries and rivals. But we don't really know anything more about the man himself. Bryson's biggest accomplishment in this book is bringing other, recent theories back to ground zero. He doesn't really lift off himself, and I think he came to realize this as the book lacks his usual engaging style in favor of something closer to an Economist report.

Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge by Max Brockman (ed) :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Future Science is a collection of essays written by young PhDs with impressive credentials. While it does touch on a variety of scientific pursuits, ranging from astronomy to viral pathology. However, a majority of the essays had to do with research into social issues (even if not overtly so, it can still be seen in that light). Anyone hoping that private industry is going to pursuits with high cost and long horizons of return will be disappointed -- these bright minds seem to be mostly engaged in corporate (profit) minded pursuits by shedding light on how people might be manipulated; socially, chemically, biologically. It seems expected that such research would go to where the money is,

I have a pretty broad range of interest in the sciences, but thanks in part to the corporate shadow, Future Science didn't push too many of my buttons. Little of it inspired me to seek out more, or even managed to get me interested in the outcome of the projects. I suppose the end result could be more compelling -- there is little that does not interest me in popular science magazines. Perhaps though the trend of spin-doctored science has left me a little jaded.

The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France by David Andress

The Terror is an in-depth look at the French state leading up to and the years following the revolution of 1792. During this remarkable period of history, public executions (the Guillotine) became common place as those in power assumed the authority to tell people how to think and act (not unlike some modern-day politicians). If you weren't an active cheerleader for the Revolutionary government, then you must be a counter-revolutionary, and that cannot be tolerated. Say goodbye to your head.

Of course, the problem with this sort of thing is rampant abuse, and eventually the Terror (as it was called) consumed its own architects, such as Maximilian "The Incorruptible" Robespierre. While lasting only about three years, The Terror saw the demise of not only the aristocratic class that had hereditarily ruled the country since the time of Charlemagne, but all contemporary political groups who might adopt an unpopular stance on issues dear to those controlling the blade of "justice."

What is remarkable is how, during this period, France managed to conduct wars against England, Prussia and Austria; as well as their own civil war against royalist factions who could still muster a fighting force. Eventually, though, it wasn't bloodshed that brought down The Terror, but rampant inflation and chronic food shortages.

Andress does an admirable job identifying the main players and reporting on their actions rather dispassionately. It is hard to find any heroes during this time, and Andress does not sympathetically create any. The last chapter briefly covers ensuing events that led to the rise of Napoleon -- a Romantic tale in contrast to the Gothic horror of The Terror. In his conclusion, he summarizes the rise and fall of The Terror through the words of some of its protagonists; but I really wanted to see more about how transition occurred that resulted in l'Empereur.
Last edited by Jeff V on Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Steron
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Steron » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:58 am

READING




READ
Skeleton Coast By Clive Cussler (Kindle)



IN QUEUE
Last edited by Steron on Thu Mar 03, 2011 12:33 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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WarPig
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by WarPig » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:37 am

I am FINALLY reading A Game of Thrones. I figured I had to because of all the HBO show buzz. I'm about halfway through it right now. Yes, I know, I need to have my nerd card revoked for not having read it until now, but in my defense, I had a lot more nerdy things to do.

EDIT: Game of Thrones finished. I was tempted to post my thoughts in the HBO series thread, but decided against it. Indeed, an amazing book. The words "epic" and "saga" tend to get thrown around in this day and age, but this work deserves it. I'm now 163 pages into A Clash of Kings, and all I have to say is...
Spoiler:
I don't know whether to pity Stannis for allowing Melisandre to corrupt his house or think he's a prick. Maybe a little of both.
Last edited by WarPig on Wed Jan 12, 2011 5:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by hentzau » Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:12 pm

Read:

The Affinity Bridge by George Mann - Very enjoyable read. Victorian Science Fiction mystery. Fun characters, a bit cliche, but a page turner. Noteable because it was the first book I read on my Nook.
The Osiris Ritual by George Mann - Sequel to The Affinity Bridge. Even more fun.
Agatha H and the Airship City by Phil and Kaja Foglio - Novelization of the first 3 Girl Genius graphic novels. Added some more detail that was missing from the webcomic/graphic novels. Highly recommended, even if you haven't read Girl Genius. And if you haven't, why not?


Currently Reading:

Time Enough for Love by Robert Heinlein
Boneshaker by Cherie Priest
Pirate Freedom byt Gene Wolfe
Last edited by hentzau on Sun Feb 27, 2011 10:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Zork
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Zork » Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:24 pm

2010 list.

Note: All reviews are of the unabridged audio version when available. Normal book reading is denoted by an asterisk (*).

READ
The Alchemist - Paul Coelho: [4/5] I enjoyed the book. It's essentially a self-help book disguised as a fable/parable. It tells the story of a young man on a quest to fulfill his "personal legend". It's short, simple and an easy read. It's a little on the mystical/pseudo-religious side, but a good reminder to follow your dreams. I would (and probably will) read it again later this year.

READING
Ender's Shadow - Orson Scott Card

QUEUE
The 4-Hour Workweek - Timothy Ferriss
Room - Emma Donoghue

-Zork

[edit: added link to my 2010 list]

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Scuzz
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Scuzz » Mon Jan 03, 2011 7:34 pm

Currently reading the 4th Omnibus in the Black Company Saga by Glen Cook....

Books 8-9 in the saga.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Wargus » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:40 pm

Read
The Evolutionary Void, Peter F. Hamilton
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll

Reading
The Count of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas

Queued
Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll
Last edited by Wargus on Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:45 pm

Ashes of Worlds by Kevin J. Anderson :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

After the first book of this seven-book saga (The Saga of the Seven Suns), I honestly didn't think I'd stick it out through the second book. But it got better, until eventually I became comfortable with the characters and was able to overlook the unlikelihood that adversaries dormant for 10,000 years would make a sudden, simultaneous comeback to wreak havoc upon the known universe. At some point, nearly every faction: human(oid) Ildirans, the Earth-centered Hansa, and the human outsiders, the Roamer clans, the giant cockroach like Klickliss, the robots they created eons ago, and elemental forces Hydrogues (electric), faeros (fire), wentals (water), and verdani (trees) were all engaged in an epic struggle.

The final volume in the story brings us back to peace. Evil is deposed, good wins the day. Fate plays more than an incidental role: at times, mere minutes dictated the fate of the forces of good. Loyalties were tested, some stayed true to the wrong path and paid the ultimate price, some redeemed themselves in the end.

The Saga of the Seven Suns is pure, science-fiction brain candy. Don't over think it, it will make your brain hurt. But if you're looking for some fun characters ranging from the incorrigibly corrupt to the supremely incorruptible, you'll enjoy the series well enough.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Pyperkub » Wed Jan 05, 2011 4:19 pm

Finished:

Against All Things Ending (Book 3 of the Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant) - Stephen R. Donaldson

This is the best of this Chronicle so far. But, I was extremely disappointed to discover that it wasn't the final book in the Chronicle - I just figured this was a trilogy too.

Donaldson really tackles Despair in this book (and does it well, while maintaining a good fantasy storyline), and maybe that touched me somewhat as last year was a tough one. From the Amazon reviews, a lot of the readers disliked this aspect of the novel, but I found it good. It's also refreshing to read a book again where the author has a better vocabulary than me.

Little Fuzzy - H. Beam Piper

An old classic, looking at the question of how to define sapience in an alien race. Grabbed for free off of manybooks.net. It's just too bad they don't have the sequel(s?) that I remember reading when I was younger.

Deadly Sanctuary - Sylvia Nobel

This was a freebie for the Kindle, and was fun for the price. It was fun to have a protagonist who didn't carry a gun in a Mystery series, set in Arizona and who was a woman. However, the love triangle was drawn out a little too long, and the ending didn't work right for me. Not a bad read for something light.

Earth - David Brin

This is an old favorite. In the late 80's, Brin decided to do a near future novel along the lines of Orwell's 1984 (which was just 1948, the year he wrote it, transposed) and go about 50 years into the future. Brin is a Hard SF writer who extrapolated a number of trends and technologies from the 80's (and invented a few new ones) to look at what life might be like on Earth in 2038. This book has the Epic scope of Dune, but with the real world grounding, and it holds up, even 20 years later. I highly recommend it to any and all SF readers - it is well written with some solid science and some interesting ideas which resonate even now.

Updated 8/21

Dream War - Stephen Propsapio
Run - Michaelbrent Collings
The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles 1) - Patrick Rothfuss
The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicles 2) - Patrick Rothfuss
The Speed of Dark - Elizabeth Moon
The Fifth Witness - Michael Connelly
Instructions for a Broken Heart - Kim Culbertson
It - Stephen King
A Little Death in Dixie - Lisa Turner
Wolf Hunt - Jeff Strand
Darkness on the Edge of Town - J. Carson Black
Season of the Harvest - Michael R. Hicks
The Blade Itself (First Law trilogy) - Joe Abercrombie
Before they are Hanged (First Law trilogy 2) Joe Abercrombie
Last Argument of Kings (First Law trilogy 3) - Joe Abercrombie
Bridge to Terabithia - Katherine Paterson and Donna Diamond
The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch
The Frozen Sky - Jeff Carlson
Water for Elephants - Sara Gruen
Alison Wonderland - Helen Smith
Full Dark, No Stars - Stephen King
Beautiful Creatures - Kami Garcia/Margaret Stohl
Last edited by Pyperkub on Thu Oct 27, 2011 3:57 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jaymann » Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:29 am

Best Served Cold by Joe Abercrombie

This is a stand alone fantasy in the same universe as The First Law trilogy (which I intend to read next). The action starts immediately and never lets up. No magic per se, just relentless gritty fighting and betrayals. A sample of the prose:


The shrillest of the brood stepped towards her, fists clenched. "I will not listen to one word more of this, you...devil! My father died at Sweet Pines!"

It seemed everyone had their own wrongs to avenge, but Monza had too many wounds of her own to be much stung by other people's. "Thank you," she said.

"What?"

"Since your father was presumably among my enemies, and the aim of a battle is to kill them, I take his death as a compliment. I shouldn't have to explain that to a soldier."

His face had turned a blotchy mixture of pink and white. "If you were a man, I'd kill you where you stand."

"If you were a man, you mean. Still, I took your father, it's only fair I give you something in trade." She curled her tongue and blew spit in his face.

Priceless.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by MHS » Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:44 am

JoeMoustache wrote:I quit on last year's post. Maybe this year will be different.
Me too. Same. Having an e-reader where I can see the covers for everything I've read might help me keep up with it.

Currently Reading:

A Clash of Kings by G.R.R. Martin (re-read)
The Theory of Poker by David Sklansky, a re-read because it's very dry and I need to re-read it often to be able to understand even a percentage of it.

Finished:

A Game of Thrones by G.R.R. Martin (re-read)
One Day by David Nicholls
The Hunger Games trilogy (The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and The Mockingjay) by Suzanne Collins, which I really enjoyed although they're technically "young adult" novels.
Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff
Last edited by MHS on Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Zarathud » Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:01 pm

I'm hoping the new Kindle will help me keep things organized this year. I'll stop reading for a while, then tear through a few books before going dormant again.

Currently Reading:
Shockwave Rider, by John Brunner
Before They Are Hanged, by Joe Abercrombie
BattleTech compilation

Finished:
The Black Prism, by Brent Weeks 1/11
Mercury Falls, by Robert Kroese 1/16
Best Served Cold, by Joe Abercrombie 1/28
Blade Itself: The First Law, by Joe Abercrombie 2/8
Last edited by Zarathud on Wed Feb 09, 2011 10:24 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Zarathud » Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:07 pm

Odin wrote:I'm currently on my 3rd or 4th attempt to read the books after the original Dune. I'm on Dune Messiah. The Brian Hebert/Kevin Anderson books have hopefully filled in enough gaps and expanded on the universe enough for me to finally find these books interesting.
Years ago, I didn't understand the original Dune until I read a coloring book and played the old Avalon Hill board game.

The Herbert/Anderson prequel books are much better written and focus on specific threads rather than weaving all over the place. The House Atrides/Harkonnen/Corrino series introduces a whole different perspective on the Universe, as does the Machine Wars-Butlerian Jihad trilogy.
"If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts." - Albert Einstein
"When the president does it, that means that it is not illegal. - Nixon
"I don't stand by anything." - Trump
“Bad men need nothing more to compass their ends, than that good men should look on and do nothing.” - John Stuart Mill, Inaugural Address Delivered to the University of St Andrews, 2/1/1867

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:57 pm

Zarathud wrote:
Odin wrote:I'm currently on my 3rd or 4th attempt to read the books after the original Dune. I'm on Dune Messiah. The Brian Hebert/Kevin Anderson books have hopefully filled in enough gaps and expanded on the universe enough for me to finally find these books interesting.
Years ago, I didn't understand the original Dune until I read a coloring book and played the old Avalon Hill board game.

The Herbert/Anderson prequel books are much better written and focus on specific threads rather than weaving all over the place. The House Atrides/Harkonnen/Corrino series introduces a whole different perspective on the Universe, as does the Machine Wars-Butlerian Jihad trilogy.
I read all of these books, as well as the Dune/Dune Messiah again. From the original Frankie Herbert books, I found all of them after God Emperor to be God Awful. I know Brian and Kevin did a few late books too, I even have them. I just haven't had the urge to run the table again to get there. The fillers between Dune and Dune Messiah were pretty good, I haven't heard where they might be going next. Have you read those, Odin?

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jag » Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:45 am

I lurk here for book recommendations, but I read way too many books in a year to keep up with it but what the hell.

Finished
His Majesty's Dragon -Naomi Novak - A reimagining of the epic events of the Napoleonic Wars with an air force—an air force of dragons, manned by crews of aviators.
Throne of Jade -Naomi Novak
Gauntlgrym - RA Salvatore - What can I say, i'm a fan of bad pulp fantasy. This one is set about 100 years after the earlier series.

Reading
Black Powder War - Naomi Novak

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:18 pm

The Open Secret of Ireland by Thomas Michael Kettle

This book is from 1912 and authored by a man that was a member of the Irish Parliament prior to Home Rule being founded in Ireland. The book is a pointed piece about the reasons and need for Ireland to have their own ability to form a government and escape from the rule of the British.

Despite the issue still not being resolved by 1914, Kettle joined the Army to fight on the continent and died fighting there in 1916.

My interests have been bent in an Irish direction of late, and I enjoyed reading the piece to gain a bit more historical perspective about what was going on during the time preceding the first World War.
Silver - soon...

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Pyperkub » Fri Jan 07, 2011 7:02 pm

Odin wrote:I may give this a shot this year. I kind of doubt I'll stick with it, but I'll try.

I'm currently on my 3rd or 4th attempt to read the books after the original Dune. I'm on Dune Messiah. The Brian Hebert/Kevin Anderson books have hopefully filled in enough gaps and expanded on the universe enough for me to finally find these books interesting.
I couldn't do it. I just re-read Dune. Every time I read it, I pick up on some new nuance, whether it's Paul's Hero's Journey, Politics, Ecology, etc.
There are three ways to not tell the truth: lies, damned lies, and statistics.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:52 am

The Weight of Blood by David Dalglish.

The book is currently $0.99 through the Kindle store and is available for me to loan out.

This is the first book in The Half-Orcs series. It follows two brothers that are half-orcs, a rarity in this world. There are, of course, full blood orcs, elves, and men, with all the requisite racial issues.

The characters are pretty much cut from the Raistlin/Caramon molds, as there's the slight, sickly magician, in this case a burgeoning necromancer, and the big, strapping fighter brother. The brothers are not heroes, they are not paragons of virtue, and they do some stuff that's downright evil.

In all, it's an interesting start to what appears to be a five-book series. It is short. The paperback clocks at 224 pages. I read it in a day. The others seem to be cheap in the Kindle format, so I may continue with it, but I'm not 100% sure at the moment.
Silver - soon...

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by silverjon » Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:06 pm

I read a trade collection of a comic miniseries called North 40 (Aaron Williams and Fiona Staples) last night and loved it. Well-drawn characters both literally and figuratively, an intricate yet cohesive plot, and lots of creepy details. Highly recommended to anyone who likes horror comics.
wot?

To be fair, adolescent power fantasy tripe is way easier to write than absurd existential horror, and every community has got to start somewhere... right?

Unless one loses a precious thing, he will never know its true value. A little light finally scratches the darkness; it lets the exhausted one face his shattered dream and realize his path cannot be walked. Can man live happily without embracing his wounded heart?

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:24 pm

Empires of the Sea: The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the World by Roger Crowley :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Prior to the 20th century, the Battle of Lepanto was the largest naval battle in history. Empires of the Sea features a blow-by-blow account of the battle, a rousing victory for the forces of Christianity amidst a sea of defeats at the hands of the Ottoman Turks, ruled by the mediocre Selim II. Despite huge losses, the Ottomans would remain a powerful force in the Mediterranean and remain so for much of the next four centuries.

The more interesting part detailed the siege of Malta. This epic battle for a strategic location consumed the later years of sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. About 9000 Knights Hospitaller and men-at-arms fended off a force of 40,000 Turks and Barbary corsairs while awaiting relief from Spain and Venice. The Turks took as much as 30,000 casualties in the assault before moving on to easier targets.

Empires at Sea is at times overly melodramatic, but is otherwise a less-than-engaging accounts of these Renaissance-era battles. Part of the problem with Lepanto was, in spite of the massive loss of life and scope of the destruction, the battle didn't really matter -- it didn't change the power balance of the world. Suleiman is a pretty fascinating character, and I think this book gave him short-shrift, as if his legacy was tied to the failure of his subordinates at Malta. The Sultan and his elite Janissaries were the dominant force during this era, but Crowley clings to the Christian successes. At this point in history, the Christian successes during the Reconquista were 80 years past, but the Turks were on the ascendant even if their Berber brothers were faltering.

Bike Snob: Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning the World of Cycling by Christopher Koelle :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

If you always thought of those colorfully clad, spandex-covered cyclists on rides sometimes more expensive that your car to be, shall we say, "elitist." then you might seek confirmation within these pages. Now, I consider myself a cyclist: I can ride 100 mile rides, I sometimes commute to work, and about my favorite thing to do on a nice summer day is to ride the 20-mile long lakefront trail in Chicago. I don't really consider myself to be a snob -- my investment is not nearly at that level. But what seems to be bizarre fashion to the uninformed truly does have purpose only realized after spending serious hours riding.

Koelle's book has purpose too that might not be apparent at first glance. Written in style of wry humor, he mixes personal anecdotes along with some well-researched history of cycling. We learn that bicycling was a highly fashionable activity early in the 20th century, especially after they worked out gearing enough to do away with the Penny Farthings (those old-timey bikes with the gigantic front wheels).

Included is a travel log following one of the earliest popular bike routes on Long Island, following as best he could descriptions of the route from old magazines. The area has evolved quite a bit...towns have changed name, and streets have changed some (but some are still intact). 95% of my riding is on known paths and roads, and this book reminded me of the joy of discovery when exploring new places or routes. To do so with in pursuit of a goal, to follow a historical path, adds to the romance.

The characterizations of different species of cyclists were funny because they are true. I'm mostly a roadie, but I've consorted with mountain bikers. Each have their own style, manners, and community. I recognize many of the traits identified, and possess quite a few myself. I was rather surprised to learn that I commit a major fashion sin though by wearing a visored helmet on a road bike. I don't really care...but after reading this book I started paying attention a little more, and yes, I guess it's true and others of my ilk undoubtedly consider me some sort of doofus. But screw them, I like my choice of helmet and one its kind did save my life once.

This is a good gift book for any cyclist in your life, or anyone who presumes to become one. And if you're often scratching your head trying to understand a cyclist in your life, maybe for you too.
Last edited by Jeff V on Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Chaosraven » Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:39 pm

I was disturbed to find a distinct lack of Spider Robinson at B&N, so I dug out my old Omnibus of Callahan's Crosstime Saloon, Time Travelers Strictly Cash, and Callahan's Secret over the weekend. I had hoped to pick up copies for a friend, now I guess I have to dig through old book boxes in the attic. But kept me happy this week.
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Jeff V » Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:44 pm

The Passage by Justin Cronin :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

What started as a summer "beach" read languished in to the fall, then winter. Part of the reason was the large size of the book (765 pages) reduces portability. The other part was unnecessary, drawn-out story lines. For a debut novel, Mr. Cronin should heed the advice of Stephen King and cut 1/3 of the book after the initial draft. The ponderous pacing through the middle of the book had me wondering for a while if I would ever get to the punchline. Finally near the end, it started to pick up a some -- only to end with partial resolution and a setup for another volume! If the next book is another 700 page monster, I might just seek out the abridged audio edition (and I never read abridgments!)

The story itself doesn't feel particularly original either. A virus is discovered in the South American jungle that turns its victims into vicious, primal creatures with an aversion to light, and superhuman speed and strength. If the "virals" don't kill you outright, a bit or scratch can transmit the virus, turning the victim after a period of illness. When the army gets a hold of the virus and starts to experiment, they choose a dozen death-row inmates as primary test subjects, as well as a young, abandon girl named Amy. The girl actually survives the virus, while the others are turned into violent creatures who break out and spread. Attempts to quarantine the Colorado research facility fail, as do attempts to isolate the state. Before long, the whole of the United States is overrun, , and the story moves to an enclave called "the colony" where battery-powered lights kept the compound bathed in protective light 24/7. Fast forward 100 years -- the batteries are starting to fail, and something must be done. A young girl wander into the colony -- Amy. A century old, she appears just slightly older, and she's not talking.

Extreme longevity (both with the virals and those survivors of the virus), combined with a sort of telepathy puts this book square into the fantasy realm. I think this was entirely unnecessary -- plausibility goes a long way in establishing a "fear factor" in horror books. 100 years seems arbitrary, and a biological connection among the virals (say, pheromones), could replace a telepathic connection.

The Passage seems more like a full-season script for a TV show than an engaging, self-contained novel. I am only slightly curious where the story goes next.

The Sex Lives of Cannibals by J. Martin Troost :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Having traveled a bit in a ostensibly "developing" Pacific island nation (The Philippines), I was interested in Troost's tale of his two years on a far more remote and limited island, the Pacific atoll Tarawa. What little I knew of this island came from studies of WWII, when this island was occupied by Japan. A Micronesian island, once part of the colonial British Gilbert Islands and now part of the independent (or, rather, desperately dependent) nation of Kiribati, Tarawa suffers from both over crowding and severe lack of sanitation.

Not only is it not a vacation destination for anyone, but it's not the sort of place one would emigrate to for even a short period of time. Troost's wife, having secured a medical appointment on the island, brought the intrepid author to this location, and he was good enough to document the experience for our edification and amusement.

Troost does a good job incorporating the history of the island, the island group, and the Kribati nation. What doesn't kill you makes you strong -- or at least gives you a good sense of humor, and Troost is definitely entertaining in his tale. Now, I think I do a good job rolling with the locals..."when in Rome..." etc. etc. Troost goes above and beyond the call. I would be more than a little rattled being in a nation where nearly every person is infected with parasitical worms. The realities of going long periods without electricity, potable water, decent food, or, gasp, BEER, would probably drive me crazy long before two years.

Troost tells us what it's like to be part of the foreign class on these islands, the corruption involved in protecting the island's food supply from overfishing by other nations, and the harrowing experience of flying on one of the island's only serviceable aircraft, an ancient relic by most accounts.

By his account, Tarawa is the sort of place one goes to check out from the civilized world. You can try to adapt, go native, but you'll always be an outsider, and the conditions will likely shorten your life span. I suppose things could have been worse...Troost didn't mention dealing with any typhoons or tsunamis while there. It's definitely not a place that one without a sense of humor should ever visit, and I can't imagine Tarawa being on anyone's short list of vacation destinations. Therefore, as a tale to be told, it is rather exotic and unique -- not many others would do such a thing and bring us the account.

Brain Bugs: How the Brain's Flaws Shape Our Lives by Dean Buonomano :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky: :binky:

Brain Bugs uses analogies from computer terminology to explain how our minds wiring sometimes resembles errant programming. From instinctual reactions (some in the animal world -- such as skunk standing ground and spraying the car that is about turn it into road kill) to mass delusion (religion); Buonomano covers a wide array of mental malfunctions of both the mundane and bizarre variety. Vestiges of evolution that equipped our cave-dwelling ancestors to survive in a hostile world are often having the opposite effect today (such as craving foods that are bad for us in quantity like fats and sugar). One of the important lessons involves just how unreliable our memories can be -- innocent people have been sent to prison because victims are convinced that someone who looks similar was the perpetrator of the crime. The power of suggestion and positive feedback also can lead our minds astray. Awareness of these flaws won't necessarily prevent it from happening to us, but knowing they exist can help guide us accordingly.
Last edited by Jeff V on Sat Aug 13, 2011 9:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Holman » Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:36 pm

I'm in! I'm hoping a list will make me finish books I start.

Finished:

A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1891-1924,Orlando Figes
The Army of Frederick the Great, Christopher Duffy
The Memory Chalet, Tony Judt -- memoir essays by the recently-deceased historian
Kaputt, Curzio Malaparte -- fictionalized memoir of WW2 by an Italian war correspondent
Night Soldiers, Alan Furst -- novel of communist agents in 1930's Europe
Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi -- graphic novel about growing up in revolutionary Iran
Dark Voyage, Alan Furst -- Small-ship naval intrigue in WW2. Good, but not as good as Night Soldiers.
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, David Mitchell -- historical novel about Dutch and Japanese characters in Nagasaki, 1799
Flashman, George Macdonald Fraser -- Uproarious faux-Victorian cad fiction. Been meaning to read this for a long time.
Achtung Schweinehund!, Harry Pearson -- comic Brit memoir of growing up as a wargamer
Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea, Robert Massie
Ivan's War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945, Catherine Merridale
The Civil War: A Narrative (Volume 3), Shelby Foote -- I finally finished this magnificent trilogy, which I appear to have read in real time.
Three Days at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership -- essays
Writing the Civil War: The Quest to Understand. ed. James McPherson & William Cooper -- essays which are more academic than that subtitle
A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin -- My first reading. This is the stuff.
The Essential Drucker, Peter Drucker -- of all things
The Radicalism of the American Revolution, Gordon Wood -- trying to make up some of my 18th century deficiency
Every single Diary of a Wimpy Kid book (with my first grader), Jeff Kinney -- Miseducating a generation to use "Me and him" as the subject of a sentence
Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust, Chris Brogan & Julien Smith
Little House in the Big Woods and Little House on the Prairie, Laura Ingalls Wilder -- with kids, but a first read for me
Work Horse of the Western Front: the 30th infantry Division in World War 2, Robert Hewitt -- I'm looking into some of the official histories, such as the Green Books

[I lost track of a few months' reading in here...]

Goshawk Squadron, Derek Robinson -- novel of WW1 aviation and black humor
Networks and States: The Global Politics of Internet Governance, Milton Mueller -- academic but surprisingly readable
The Name of the Wind, Patrick Rothfuss -- I put this one aside but came back to it, and I'm in. I can see better now why you all love it!
A Wrinkle in TIme, Madeleine L'Engle -- for the kids, but who doesn't love this book?
The Book of Three, Lloyd Alexander -- (ditto)
Why Arendt Matters, Elisabeth Young-Bruehl -- book-length essay on Hannah Arendt
Last edited by Holman on Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:52 pm, edited 23 times in total.
Much prefer my Nazis Nuremberged.

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Kasey Chang
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by Kasey Chang » Sun Jan 16, 2011 8:07 pm

ChaoZ wrote:Finished:
On Basilisk Station - David Weber (Honorverse #1)
The Honor of the Queen - David Weber (Honorverse #2)

Reading:
The Short Victorious War - David Weber (Honorverse #3)
Took you long enough... :)

David Weber always said that Honor Harrington was modeled after Horatio Hornblower... up to a certain point. You'll like how the story turned in the next few books, like when Grayson got involved, and how the universe evolves as well, and things keep happening in other parts of the galaxy.

What I don't like is how the characters seem to be talking too much at times, and the political intrigue is a bit overwhelming at times.
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ChaoZ
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by ChaoZ » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:00 pm

Kasey Chang wrote:
ChaoZ wrote:Finished:
On Basilisk Station - David Weber (Honorverse #1)
The Honor of the Queen - David Weber (Honorverse #2)

Reading:
The Short Victorious War - David Weber (Honorverse #3)
Took you long enough... :)

David Weber always said that Honor Harrington was modeled after Horatio Hornblower... up to a certain point. You'll like how the story turned in the next few books, like when Grayson got involved, and how the universe evolves as well, and things keep happening in other parts of the galaxy.

What I don't like is how the characters seem to be talking too much at times, and the political intrigue is a bit overwhelming at times.
It's the number of characters which gets me sometimes. Too many political figures on both sides, and too many agendas in play. Some of those paragraphs are hard to slog through. On the fourth book now, and it looks like the whole thing is a political play.

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ChaoZ
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Re: Books Read 2011

Post by ChaoZ » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:02 pm

Chaosraven wrote:I was disturbed to find a distinct lack of Spider Robinson at B&N, so I dug out my old Omnibus of Callahan's Crosstime Saloon, Time Travelers Strictly Cash, and Callahan's Secret over the weekend. I had hoped to pick up copies for a friend, now I guess I have to dig through old book boxes in the attic. But kept me happy this week.
His stuff is sadly underrated. I have to dig my "Chronicals" out in the near future (though I fear it may be in an unmarked box somewhere.)

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